New Digital Technologies and the Challenges of Evidence

As a result of a related and initial collaborative exploration with Anna Agathangelou, this research explores a new dimension of digital technologies and their roles in creating a ‘human rights technology revolution’ (Kelly Matheson, WITNESS). Yet how are these technologies—such as satellite tracking, crowd  sourcing, and social media—transforming socio-legal worlds? Are witnesses using social media to transmit evidence to legal officers, even evidence of mass atrocities? Are perpetrators of mass violence using social media to coordinate their efforts? Relatedly, how are these new technologies being incorporated in the juridical realm, such as in international courts and tribunals to transform lives in the 21st century? How will international courts navigate the introduction of new tracking technologies as the basis for new evidentiary forms that are emblematic of the new millennium? These questions highlight the contours of change in juridico-legal systems in the contemporary digital era.   By illuminating transformational entanglements amongst states, experts and non-state actors, such as members of civil society, and legal practitioners, this research will contribute to rethinking various approaches to the Anthropology of law and justice, the globalization of human rights, and the Anthropology of technology and the body.